November 2018

Written by WISDOM on . Posted in Newsletters

Calendar for WISDOM and Other Interfaith Events 
 
Thursday, November 1st, 6:30 PM at Thai Basil im Livonia
Sister Circle Get Together
Interested?  Contact Shama Mehta at shama.mehta7@gmail.com 

Monday, November 5th 1:00 – 3:00 PM
WISDOM’s Five Women Five Journeys at SOAR
Adat Shalom Synagogue, 29901 Middlebelt, Farmington HIlls
Wednesday, November 7th, 7-9 Women Confronting Racism Lecture
Civil Discourse – Exploring racism within ourselves and our society.
St. John’s Episcopal Church, 26998 Woodward Ave., Royal Oak
See Flyer Below
Sunday, November 11th 11:00 AM
Jewish Community Center Book Fair WISDOM presentation
of book Friendship and Faith
6600 W. Maple Rd., West Bloomfield
See flyer Below
Sunday, November 11th, 3:00 PM – 6:00 PM
InterFaith Leadership Council of Metropolitan Detroit
Panel on “Religious Sensitivities” at st George Antiochian Orthodox Church, 2160 Maple Rd., Troy 48083
See Flyer Below
Thursday, November 14th 7 – 9, Women Confronting Racism Lecture
Examining White Fragility
St. John’s Episcopal Church, 26998 Woodward Ave. Royal Oak
See Flyer Below
Thursday, December 5th  7 – 9, Women Confronting Racism Lecture
The Intersectionality of Culture, Race, and Gender
St. John’s Episcopal Church, 26998 Woodward Ave. Royal Oak
See Flyer Below
Saturday, December 8th 10:00 – 3:00
Mosaic Tile Sale
See Flyer Below
Tuesday, December 11th, 6:30 PM
Mosaic Art Workshop with Song and Spirit Institute for Peace
4300 Rochester Road, Royal Oak
Save the Date
Sunday, March 24th, 2019 (afternoon)
Celebration of International Women’s Day
Save the Date

WISDOM Women will be presenting “Friendship and Faith” 2nd Edition at the Jewish Community Center’s 2018 Book Fair, on November 11th at 11:00 AM. Come join us at the JCC, 6600 W. Maple Road, West Bloomfield, MI 48322
Gail Katz will facilitate and introduce Rabbi Dorit Edut, Najah Bazzy, and Padma Kuppa, who will read excerpts from their stories and respond to questions from the audience.
Purchase our book at the JCC or find it online at Amazon, in both print and e-book formats.
Questions?  Contact Gail at gailkatz@comcast.net

Muslims Raise $146K for Victims in Synagogue
Detroit Free Press
Niraj Warikoo
Muslims have raised more than $146,000 so far through a Detroit-based fundraising site to help the victims of the Pittsburgh synagogue attack.
After the attack on Saturday that killed 11 inside the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, Muslims mobilized on LaunchGood, an online site headquartered in Detroit  created and led by Muslims since 2013. The site is similar to platforms like GoFundMe.
The effort is focused on raising money to help support shooting victims with short-term needs such as funeral expenses and medical bills, according to LaunchGood. The money is being distributed to the synagogue through the Islamic Center of Pittsburgh.
LaunchGood said the campaign for the synagogue victims was started by two Muslim groups, Celebrate Mercy, which honors Islam’s prophet, and MPower Change, a nonprofit group that mobilizes Muslims on social justice issues.
“It was very sickening to see the synagogue attacked like that,” Subhan Vahora, a manager at Celebrate Mercy, which is based in Philadelphia, told the Free Press. “Our organization teaches about the life of the prophet. Many of his teachings tell us to try and respond to these evil actions with good. And so we thought, what better way to reach out to our Abrahamic cousins and support the Jewish community in hard times.”
Vahora recounted a story in Islam where Prophet Mohammed is said to have stood up to show respect as a Jewish funeral procession passed by. He said that the fundraising is one way that Muslims and Jews can come together. In a statement, LaunchGood said “the Muslim-American community extends its hands to help the shooting victims, whether it is the injured victims or the Jewish families who have lost loved ones.”
“We wish to respond to evil with good, as our faith instructs us, and send a powerful message of compassion through action. Our Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, said: ‘Show mercy to those on Earth, and the One in the Heavens will show mercy to you.’ The Quran also teaches us to ‘Repel evil by that which is better.'”
Saturday’s shooting was the deadliest attack on Jewish people in the history of the U.S., according to the Anti-Defamation League. Before he attacked, the shooter had expressed anger about Jewish groups helping migrants and Muslim immigrants.
On Saturday, LaunchGood set a goal of raising $25,000 and quickly reached that. It then increased the goal to $50,000, then $75,000, and now $150,000. LaunchGood has been raising more than $3,000 per hour.
It has now raised $146,985 as of late Monday afternoon with 3,471 supporters donating. “Through this campaign, we hope to send a united message from the Jewish and Muslim communities that there is no place for this type of hate and violence in America,” said LaunchGood. “We pray that this restores a sense of security and peace to the Jewish-American community who has undoubtedly been shaken by this event.  The CEO of LaunchGood, Chris Abdur-Rahman Blauvelt, of Dearborn, helped co-found LaunchGood in 2013. The crowdfunding site said it has raised more than $55 million with more than 5,000 fundraising campaigns.  Last year, it helped raise $162,000 to help repair Jewish cemeteries that were vandalized. 
After the Pittsburgh shooting, LaunchGood featured on its main page a headline that read “Muslims Unite for Pittsburgh Synagogue. Donate to Shooting Victims’ Families.” Vahora, whose group Celebrate Mercy started the fundraising efforts, said the huge response “shows the beauty of humanity and the power we have when we all work together.”
In metro Detroit, other Muslim-American and Arab-American groups have been speaking out about the Pittsburgh shooting. The Arab American Civil Rights League in Dearborn, Imams Council of Michigan, and the Islamic Institute of America in Dearborn Heights, released statements condemning the attack.
“This unfathomable crime should be condemned by all people of faith and conscience,” said the Islamic Institute of America, led by Imam Hassan Qazwini. “United, we send a strong message that no such crime will be tolerated by any individual. Synagogues, churches, mosques and all places of worship are sacred grounds and their sanctities should be preserved.
“… We offer our heartfelt condolences to the families of the victims as our thoughts and prayers are with them during this trying time.”
The Imams Council of Michigan said in a statement on Monday that “Muslims are obliged to protect all houses of worship, as the holy Quran teaches. … Anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, xenophobia, and racial discrimination are plaguing our country and they must stop.”

Dear Friend in Faith,

Since 2015, over 400 congregations have received more $500,000 worth of FREE energy efficiency upgrades through Light the Way, a program Michigan IPL offers with Consumers Energy. Until now, this program has only been available to Consumers Energy customers with electric service. Starting this week, houses of worship with Consumers gas service are eligible to sign up!
That’s why I’m reaching out to congregations in Oakland, Livingston, Macomb, Lapeer, Tuscola, Huron, and Van Buren counties, plus a few neighboring communities. So far, participating houses of worship have received an average of $1,300 worth of free upgrades and expect to save $650 each year on energy bills-savings that can go right back into their vital missions. Saving energy is a great way for congregations to put their faith into action-to become better stewards of God’s Creation, while also being better stewards of their own financial resources.
This program is available for a limited time and on a first come, first served basis. For more information and to sign-up, visit our website or contact me at (248) 463-8811 or projectmanager@miipl.org
Best regards,
Jennifer Young
Program Manager

A Muslim, a Jew, and a Christian
walk into a concert hall…
…and treat an audience to an
inspiring night of song, story, and laughter.
Watch the You Tube video by clicking below:
Interfaith Band “Abraham Jam” will be worth the trip to Kalamazoo 7 p.m. Nov. 18, @ congregation of Moses
Congregation of Moses, a member of United Synagogue of America, welcomes Abraham Jam to perform 7 p.m. Nov. 18 , 2501 Stadium Drive Kalamazoo, MI 49008.
Abraham Jam-composed of Billy Jonas, David LaMotte, and Dawud Wharnsby-features three “brothers” from the three Abrahamic faiths. Jonas, LaMotte and Wharnsby have performed extensively over the last few decades in their individual careers.
“Harmony is better than unity,” says David LaMotte, who helped create Abraham Jam. “We don’t have to be singing the same note to cultivate peace, we can sing different notes that are beautiful together.” LaMotte is a well-loved songwriter, with over 3000 concerts on five continents and every state in the U.S. on his musical resumé.
They don’t just take turns sharing songs, but create music together, contributing vocal harmonies, percussion, and instrumentation to each other’s songs.
These three seasoned songwriters, have teamed up to make a convincing case that harmony, where they sing different notes that are beautiful together, To them, this is even better than unity.

‘The church needs women for its salvation’:
One-woman play champions nun’s quest for social justice
By
Linda Stamato
Some 28 years ago, Teri Bays sent a letter to Benedictine nun Joan Chittister. “I wish your words were on my lips,” wrote Bays.
They are now…..with stunning and, at times, shocking, effect.
Joan Chittister: Her Story, My Story, Our Story, created by Bays, a singer, writer and actress from Sedona, AZ, was performed by Bays on Friday at St. Mark Lutheran Church in Harding.
The large and appreciative audience gave Ms. Bays a standing, sustained ovation at the conclusion of her performance.
Joan Chittister is a woman for all seasons. With 60 books, 12 honorary degrees, leadership positions too numerous to count, and a global following, this revered author and speaker has had a lot to say about peace, justice, women’s issues and the role of religious life in the modern world.  She certainly has created a presence.  And Teri Bays, her disciple, “becomes” her to demonstrate through Chittister’s words-and her own-the profound connection between them. She intensifies Chittister’s impact and makes it at once personal and universal. The performance is deeply affecting.
As Bays moves from left to right on the stage, we hear each woman in various times and places, and witness the strands of experience that connect them.  Bays’ mother was in elementary school with Chittister;  both women, as girls, sought refuge from terror in their households that were fueled by their fathers’ alcoholism and abuse.
Seeking freedom from fear, they found solace in books, in their diaries and journals, and in companionship and support in the homes of friends, in Bays’ case, and in Chittister’s, in the Benedictine convent which she joined as a novice in 1952. Their paths diverge and come together as certain themes emerge: Struggling for standing, engaging in protest, embracing non-denominational spirituality, seeking self-understanding in times of change, teaching to embrace social justice, and loving music.
 
Benedictine nun Joan Chittister.
They both experience and resist intolerance, racism and sexism in the church, and, confidently, distance themselves from it.
Seeking to advance morality over religiosity, they take stands for life-more than birth, living free from poverty and duress-they attack the “enemies of our time: Power and profit,” and they assert their equality, resist silencing, and answer the call to leadership, in different ways to be sure.
As Chittister says, “The church needs women for its salvation,” I heard a strong echo from her disciple and supportive murmurs from the audience. Bays’ performance is delivered with a heavy hand-Chittister’s compelling words-but also with a light touch-expressing the great good humor of both of these talented, courageous and resilient women.
Prophets and poets both, they are leading the new way, using public settings, churches, lecture halls and stages to have their voices heard, urging people, as Chittister says, “to live faithfully and to love radically, ” to be public thinkers so as to inspire openness to possibility, resisting retreat to past ways. Billed as “a one woman play for all women,” Joan Chittister: Her Story, is so much more.  It is a play for men too, and especially for those who wear clerical collars; it is for all those who work for change in the church and more, for those who share faith in humanity, peace, spirituality and common purpose.
Bays’ appearance was supported in part by the Sophia Inclusive Catholic Community, whose roots are solidly in the tradition of Vatican II.  Its mission was given a burst of energy and spirit tonight and Sister Joan Chittister and Teri Bays found themselves in good company.

Late in November 2016, people from all over the country gathered in Cambridge, Mass., for an experimental meeting in an austere room at Harvard Divinity School. It was deeply cold outside, and just weeks after the election, many of the participants were feeling shaken.
Around the table where they had gathered were two demographic groups that rarely encounter each other: millennials who describe themselves as having no single religious practice (better known as “nones”); and Catholic women religious, who mostly prefer to be called sisters but will settle for being called nuns.
They had gathered to share experiences of community, spirituality and activism. More quickly than anyone had anticipated, they discovered enough common ground to lead one of the sisters to tell the millennials, “I believe that we are more alike than we are different.”
Although the number of nones is growing, making up nearly 25 percent of the population, according to the Pew Research Center, they are far from apathetic about what religion can offer, and many are self-described spiritual seekers. At the same time, according to the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate, the number of sisters is shrinking and aging, with fewer than 50,000 sisters alive today, and nearly 90 percent of those sisters are over the age of 60. But women religious are often the first to tell you that they aren’t experiencing a narrative of decline, because they still have millennia of wisdom and experience to share.
The Nuns and Nones project seeks to bring these two groups together in order to explore new forms of community life, help millennials see models for sustainable activism and create an intergenerational network of connections, what the project’s website describes as “an unlikely alliance across communities of spirit.” Different people emphasized different turning points in the origin of the project, but the sisters and millennials I interviewed all agreed: It began with a gathering, a circle, and it began with conversation.
The Harvard Nuns and Nones gatherings were sponsored by How We Gather, a project led by Casper ter Kuile and Angie Thurston, two postgraduate fellows at Harvard Divinity School. How We Gather explores how millennials are building communities of meaning outside of institutional religious structures.
They were organized by the Rev. Wayne Muller, who is in his mid-60s and was ordained in the United Church of Christ, and Adam Horowitz, 31, who grew up in a secular Jewish family and now runs a nonprofit called the U.S. Department of Arts and Culture.
To read the rest of this interesting article please go to the following site:
https://www.americamagazine.org/faith/2018/09/04/what-can-nuns-and-nones-learn-one-another

The rise of the imama: women-led mosques are growing
Negative stereotypes abound of how women are treated under Islam. But there’s a new movement of women-led mosques who are challenging this, and making both Muslims and non-Muslims think differently about the faith.
Sherin Khankan is Denmark’s first female imam, who opened the Mariam mosque in Copenhagen in 2016.
By Sara Miller Llana/The Christian Science Monitor
By Lin TaylorThomson Reuters Foundation
Copenhagen
From Copenhagen to Los Angeles, a handful of female mosques now cater to Muslim women who want their own place of worship, just as men have had through the ages.
“It is possible to change a narrative that has been patriarchal for centuries,” Sherin Khankan, founder of Europe’s first women’s mosque, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.
Her first-floor mosque – adjacent to a clothes shop – is invisible from the busy Danish shopping street below. But behind its anonymous, grey door, a quiet revolution is brewing.
For the past two years, women have been leading prayers, delivering sermons and running Copenhagen’s Mariam Mosque – though Ms. Khankan says she is not challenging the Koran, just rewriting a male-dominated way of worship.
“We can do that by promoting and disseminating new narratives, with a focus on gender equality. It’s not a reform. We’re going back to the essence of Islam,” she said, draping a red floral shawl across her shoulder. Although men and women are allowed to meet and pray during the week at Mariam Mosque, the mosque’s monthly, collective Friday prayers are for women only, said 43-year-old Khankan.
With a tiny prayer room and simple decor of candles, cushions and rugs, the mosque has about 150 worshippers. It was set up by Khankan with the support of Femimam, a group of female Muslim spiritual leaders in Denmark.
Muslim women’s groups and researchers say there is a lack of female Islamic leaders and dearth of worship spaces for women, since most mosques are gender-segregated and men dominate the main prayer rooms. So, after 15 years in the making, Mariam Mosque joined a handful of female-friendly mosques, including two in Los Angeles, another in the German city of Berlin – which welcomes men and women to Friday prayers – and a new build slated for the northern English city of Bradford, where there are plans to build Britain’s first women-led mosque by 2020.
Women-only mosques have existed for hundreds of years in China, where women have had a long tradition of leading prayers.
Director of Britain’s Muslim Women’s Council Bana Gora, who is spearheading the Bradford project, said mosques had overlooked women and girls for years. Ms. Gora said some women have had to pray in basements of mosques, or use back entrances where there are safety concerns such as a lack of lighting or security.
“Where do women congregate to talk about issues in society? You need a dedicated space where women can convene and talk to people who can help them, and we simply do not have those spaces anywhere,” she said in a telephone interview.
“It’s about women claiming their space in a mosque – there’s nothing wrong with that. I can see this catapulting across different faiths as well over time,” said Gora.
Khankan said the presence of fellow women in a mosque, as well as access to female spiritual leaders, meant women might feel comfortable seeking help for sensitive issues like inter-faith marriage or domestic violence. And for the 200 or so women in Denmark who wear a face veil, their world has grown smaller after a ban on niqab veils and body-length burqas in public spaces, said Khankan.
Denmark’s parliament enacted the ban in May, joining France and some other European Union countries to uphold what some politicians say are secular and democratic values. The justice ministry said the ban would focus on women forced by their families to wear veils.
“If a woman is isolated and forced to wear a burqa or the niqab, by criminalizing it, you will isolate her even more, because she might not be able to go out,” said Khankan, who also runs a domestic violence support group, Exit Circle. “It’s important to fight for any women’s right to wear the hijab or not, to wear the niqab or not – if it’s her own choice and her own free will,” she said.
Khankan said she hopes to see a new generation of female Islamic scholars and worship leaders, or ‘imam’ – a title normally given to men, which Khankan has proudly claimed.
“We are faced with patriarchal structures which we have normalized for decades. As long as they are alive and they are not challenged, we have a problem,” said Khankan.
“We have to state that women are the future of Islam. We have to make it possible for women to have the same possibilities as men,” she added.
The Koran does not directly address whether women can lead congregational prayer, according to many traditional Islamic scholars.
Some argue the Prophet Mohammad gave permission to women to lead any kind of prayer, while others say that he meant to restrict women to leading prayer at home.
Still, many traditionalists do not believe a man should hear a woman’s voice in prayer. But Giulia Liberatore, who is researching female Islamic scholars at the University of Edinburgh, said seeing women reach positions of power in Islam will have positive effects.
“If women see other women striving for the highest form of scholarship, they will start seeing themselves as someone who can do that as well,” she said.
This story was reported by the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Global Hindu Gathering Draws Crowd, Protest in Chicago
By Emily McFarlan Miller on September 10th
LOMBARD, Ill. (RNS) – About 2,500 people from 60 countries attended the second World Hindu Congress last weekend near Chicago. The congress – which followed an inaugural gathering four years ago in India – opened Friday (Sept. 7) with a long blast from a conch shell to create good vibrations, a lamp lighting ceremony to dispel darkness, and a mantra calling for unity. There also were messages from world leaders like the Dalai Lama, spiritual leader of Tibetan Buddhists, who sent a video, and India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who sent a letter.
The gathering, organized by the World Hindu Foundation, calls itself “a global platform for Hindus to connect, share ideas, inspire one another, and impact the common good.” And, like at many religious gatherings these days, a dispute broke out over religion and politics
A historic gathering The gathering was an historic event for Hindus, coming 125 years, nearly to the day, after a famed speech by Swami Vivekananda to the World’s Parliament of Religions in Chicago. That speech “put Hinduism on the global map,”according to Nitika Sharma, spokesperson for the World Hindu Congress.
A towering statue of Swami Vivekananda was unveiled to mark the occasion, and several speakers at the opening plenary referenced his speech, in which he said he was proud to belong to a “religion which has taught the world both tolerance and universal acceptance.”
“That singular event, that singular act, changed the course of history and paved the way for Hindus to carry their traditions and values with confidence and pride as they traveled and settled in different corners of the world,” said Abhaya Asthana, president of Vishwa Hindu Parishad of America and coordinator of the 2018 congress. “Today, once again, we gather here in Chicago – this time, as a people, to echo and reaffirm the same old message of diversity, universal acceptance and cooperation.”
But not even a faith tradition that cherishes acceptance and cooperation is immune to political and cultural divides.
Panelists in a Friday afternoon session on cultivating political leadership in the United States and other Western democracies noted sponsors and speakers had been targeted with petitions asking them to withdraw from the event.
U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, the first Hindu elected to Congress, reportedlywithdrew months ago, citing “ethical reasons arising from participating in partisan politics of India in America.” Gabbard’s office did not return a call for comment, and organizers did not immediately answer how many panelists or sponsors had dropped out.
The Coalition for the Defense of the Constitution and Democracy also held a news conference in New York City prior to the congress, protesting the involvement of participants from VHPA, Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh and other groups. The coalition claimed in a press release that those groups are “promoting the agenda of Hindutva fascism under the cover of ‘Hindu resurgence.'”
Sunita Viswanath is co-founder of Sadhana, a group of progressive Hindus that joined other South Asian human rights, Hindu, Dalit, Muslim and secular activist organizations in the coalition. She said the coalition did not object to people gathering in general.
But they were protesting the ideology of some participating speakers and groups, which Viswanath described as “Hindu nationalist, Hindu supremacist.”
“A gathering like the World Hindu Congress seems to be celebrating Hinduism and India at a time when we think what’s urgent is speaking out for peace and nonviolence, for a feeling of brotherhood among people,” she said.
RSS is as an “ideological, nationalist Hindu group” that helped Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party rise to power in India in 2014, Reuters reports. The country’s Muslims and other religious and caste minorities since have pointed to incidents of religious violence and discrimination.
A panel discusses the collective efforts for Hindu resurgence during the World Hindu Congress on Sept. 7, 2018, near Chicago. RNS photo by Emily McFarlan Miller
The congress confirmed several people were arrested Friday after creating a disturbance during a panel discussion on collective efforts for Hindu resurgence that included Mohan Bhagwat, the head of RSS. Chicago South Asians for Justice posted a statement online saying they had staged the “peaceful disruption.” A video posted online showed people surrounding and shouting over protesters holding up a banner.
A ‘core value’ of Hinduism
Despite the protests, congress spokesperson Sharma defended RSS’ participation in the congress. It’s about “creating a proud Hindu identity,” she said, denying claims that made RSS or the congress a nationalist group: “I don’t think it is the correct way to describe us.”
Diversity of thought is “one of the core values of Hindu dharma,” or teaching, which includes a number of schools that can be contradictory but still are united in their fundamental beliefs, according to Sharma.
Because of that, she said, “We do believe that everyone should be free to choose what they believe in. Just like we’re proud to do this, if someone feels strongly against it, they’re free to express their views. … In some sense, some people are taking notice of what we’re doing, as well.”
Vindhya Adapa, a 28-year-old Hindu-American attorney for HIAS, a refugee resettlement agency, in Washington, D.C., said she only was “very, very vaguely” aware of the controversy before attending the event.
During the panel on cultivating political leadership, Adapa took the microphone to say she identified with the Democratic Party and to ask how to work together with other Hindus across party lines. She told Religion News Service she came to the congress “to learn more about my faith and learn more about service opportunities, political opportunities and network with people.”
“At the end of the day, this is a very diverse conference,” she said.
“I’m not going to agree with everyone who’s here, and I didn’t come here to find an echo chamber, so, yes, there may be certain politicians or certain leaders that not everyone agrees with, and perhaps that could be one reason why people thought it safe to avoid this conference. For me, personally speaking, this is an opportunity and a place to foster collaborative Hindu identity and thinking.”
The next World Hindu Congress is planned for 2022 in Bangkok.

WISDOM Mission Statement

To Provide concrete modeling of women from different faith traditions working together in harmony for the common good.
To Empower women to take a more active role in furthering social justice and world peace.
To Dispel myths, stereotypes, prejudices and fear about faith traditions different from our own.
To Nurture the growth of empathy and spiritual energy that result from our projects and interfaith dialogue.

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