October 2018

Written by WISDOM on . Posted in Newsletters

Calendar for WISDOM and Other Interfaith Events 
 
Ask A Jewish Person
Wednesday, October 3rd, 6:00 – 7:30 PM
Islamic Center of America
19600 Ford Rd., Dearborn MI
See Flyer Below

Wednesday, October 10th 7:00 – 9:00 PM
WISDOM’s Five Women Five Journeys
Muslim Unity Center, 1830 W. Square Lake Rd. Bloomfield Hills
See information below
Thursday, October 11th, Explore the Hindu Festival of Navaratri at the Bharatiya Temple in Troy. 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM
See information below!


Exploring Our Religious Landscapes Series
Sufism on October 18th at 7:00 PM
See Flyer Below
Sunday, October 21st, 2:00 PM
WISDOM Visit to the Hellenic Museum
67 E. Kirby, Detroit 48202
See Flyer Below
Thursday, November 1st, 6:30 PM at Thai Basil in Livonia
Sister Circle Get Together
Interested?  Contact Shama Mehta at shama.mehta7@gmail.com
Monday, November 5th 1:00 – 3:00 PM
WISDOM’s Five Women Five Journeys at SOAR
Society for Active Retirees
Birmingham Temple, 28611 W. 12 Mile Rd.,  Farmington HIlls


Sunday, November 11th 11:00 AM
Jewish Community Center Book Fair WISDOM presentation
of book Friendship and Faith
6600 W. Maple Rd., West Bloomfield
See information below
Sunday, November 11th, 3:00 PM – 6:00 PM
InterFaith Leadership Council of Metropolitan Detroit
Panel on “Religious Sensitivities” at st George Antiochian Orthodox Church, 2160 Maple Rd., Troy 48083
See Flyer Below
Sunday, November 18th, 3:30 – 7:00 PM
Jewish Historical Society event at the
Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn.
See Flyer Below
Tuesday, December 11th, 6:30 PM
Mosaic Art Workshop with Song and Spirit Institute for Peace
4300 Rochester Road, Royal Oak
See information below!
Sunday, March 24th, 2019 (afternoon)
Celebration of International Women’s Day
Save the Date

Five-part program examines mysticism
in religious traditions

By Stephanie Preweda Special to Digital First Media

There are those of faith who worship only during holidays and those who worship weekly. Then there are those who take steps to deepen their faith so much it becomes a mystical experience.

The Rev. Charles Packer, lead minister of Pine Hill Congregational Church in West Bloomfield, taught an educational program, Mysticism in Christianity on Sept. 12.
The Rev. Charles Packer, lead minister of Pine Hill Congregational Church in West Bloomfield, hosted an educational program, Mysticism in Christianity, from 7-9 p.m. Sept. 12 at the church, 4160 Middlebelt Road in West Bloomfield Township. This was the first in a a five-part series about mysticism in five major faith-based traditions – Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Sikhism and Hinduism – presented by the InterFaith Leadership Council of Metropolitan Detroit.
Each educational presentation will be at a different location over the course of four months.
“In each one of our religious traditions, there is a mystical movement,” said Packer. “The mystics, whether they be prophets, saints, gurus or Sufis, had something in common. The mystics tended to be experiential in nature.”
During the program, Parker touched on the earliest known Christian mystics dating from the Middle Ages, such as Saint Catherine of Sienna and Saint Theresa of Abila. Becoming a mystic is not something that can be attained through a series of steps; rather it describes a life-changing experience based on the deepening of one’s faith. People cannot choose to have a mystical experience, he said – rather they are chosen to experience mystical guidance.
Packer explained that those individuals would not have been labeled as a mystic during their time, but is something that was imposed on individuals at a later date.
“Those who we would say or think are mystics were very rooted in their tradition,” he says. “They weren’t necessarily seeking something new, they were simply trying to go deeper in their own various traditions.”
Through history, those who dove deeper in their faith tended to document experiences through their spiritual journeys. These experiences were collected in literature over hundreds of years, detailing phenomena of individuals who who we now call mystics.
These phenomena included visions or dreams so strong they are described as a physical encounter with the Divine. The repetition of dreams and visions guided the individual’s life in a mystical way, Packer says.
“(Mystics) do a lot of writing that is self disclosing, and so they end up sharing their experiences with faith and what we end up with is literature that reflects, for many of us, what would be an unusual expression of faith,” Parker says. “Throughout centuries, this literature has helped us understand how individuals express their faith in different time periods.”
The Kabbalistic Tree of Life with the names of the Sephiroth and paths in Hebrew.  Public Domain
In other traditions, mysticism may be studied as esoteric learnings and interpretations of the holy scriptures. One example that is well known in popular culture is the Kabbalah. Kabbalah has become a buzzword since pop singer Madonna announced that she was studying the ancient mysticism, which rose from Jewish tradition. Kabbalist teachings are said to explain hidden meanings of the Hebrew Bible, known as the Torah, and traditional rabbinic literature.
The Islamic mystical tradition called Sufism, which exists in both Sunni and Shia Islam, is characterized by ascetism and missionary work. It is not a sect, but a way of understanding the religion more deeply. Sufi teachers work to transmit divine light to the heart of the student, and to perfectly follow Divine Law.
* If You Go: Register for individual sessions or the series at at iflc.wufoo.com/forms/r1jo5m5516l79jn/.
Walk-in registration welcome. Suggested donation $20 per program.

October 10th Five Women Five Journeys
at the Muslim Unity Center
This program features personal stories of women of different faith traditions – how their childhood impacted their beliefs today, what challenges are for women in their faith tradition, what parts of their religion is misunderstood, how reaching out to someone from a different faith tradition has enriched their lives.

The program will begin at 7:00 PM and end at 9:00 AM. There will be an opportunity for questions and answers with the panel.  Any questions, please contact Paula Drewek at drewekpau@aol.com or 586-5589-7545

October 11th 6:00 – 10:00 PM, Come to the
Bharatiya Temple in Troy
and learn about the Hindu Festival of Navaratri. Navaratri is the festival of nine nights, when, through folk dance, the Feminine aspect of Divinity is worshiped. This festival is the celebration of the Shakti (The Primoridal Power), the female aspect of creation that gives birth to the entire universe and sustains it. You will meet Shama Mehta, a WISDOM Board Member and Interfaith Chaplain, at 6:00 PM in the prayer hall for a tour of the prayer hall with Q & A, followed by an introduction to Garba, worship through dance, and entry in the Garba Hall. The Garba celebration begins at 7:00 PM and runs until 10:00 PM, but you are free to depart as you schedule necessitates. There will be a nominal fee to enter the Garba Hall.  Bharatiya Temple is located at 6850 N. Adams Rd., Troy, MI 48098. Any questions, please contact Shama Mehta at shama.mehta7@gmail.com

November 11th WISDOM presents “Friendship and Faith,” the second edition at the
Jewish Community Center Bookfair.
Several WISDOM authors will read excerpts from their stories, discuss their story, answer questions and be aviloable to sign all boks that are purchased. The program will run from 11:00 AM until noon at the Jewish Community center, 6600 W. Maple Rd., West Bloomfield MI 48322.  Any questions, please contact Gail Katz at gailkatz@comcast.net or 248-978-6664
December 11th Mosaic workshop
Ever want to make a piece of Mosaic artwork? WISDOM and Song and Spirit Institute for Peace are partnering to give you a chance to create a piece of mosaic artwork for yourself or to give as a holiday gift. Song and Spirit Institute is located at 4300 Rochester Rd., Royal Oak, MI 48073. Check the WISDOM website, www.interfaithwisdom.org for more information as we get closer to December.

WISDOM Women will be presenting “Friendship and Faith” 2nd edition at the Jewish Community Center’s 2018 Book Fair, on November 11th at 11:00 AM. Come join us at the JCC, 6600 W. Maple Road, West Bloomfield, MI 48322.

Gail Katz will facilitate and introduce Rabbi Dorit Edut, Najah Bazzy, and Padma Kuppa, who will read excerpts from their stories and respond to questions from the audience.

Purchase our book at the JCC or find it online at Amazon, in both print and e-book formats.

Questions?  Contact Gail Katz at gailkatz@comcast.net

                             

Heaven on Earth
Hugh Beckman M.D. 1952 (revised 2014)
Jesus, Moses, Mohammed his name
And far and wide was known the fame,
Of this frail man, who lay half dead,
Some say with a halo around his head.
A holy man among holies was he,
The very essence of piety.
And every day you could always see,
Him standing with the Shofar to his lips,
Blowing the Angelus from the Minaret tips.
Chanting: Wa Mohammed, la ilaha il Allah, Sh’ma Yisrael, Ave Maria
To him these words all seemed the same,
For he loved one God who had no name.
Not the same he thought, for many around,
As hatred, greed, and war abound.
Chanting: Wa Mohammed, la ilaha il Allah, Sh’ma Yisrael, Ave Maria
These words of righteous piety,
Often act to tear apart society.
He thought, I”d change them if I can,
To bond man to God, and man to man.
Chanting: Wa Mohammed la ilaha il Allah, Sh’ma Yisrael, Ave Maria
As his eyes last beheld the setting sun,
A Voice above said that he was the one
To change the words, that all may say,
At last for I’ve seen the light of day.
And so , with the Shofar to his lips,
He climbed at the Angelus to the Minaret tips.
And as his failing life expired
He found the words to change; he was inspired
Shalom, Saalam, and Peace be With You;
I bequeath these words, I believe them True:
Now Chanting:
The culmination of One’s life,
The full measure of One’s worth;
Is not just making One’s way to Heaven,
But One’s helping to make Heaven on Earth.

(RNS) – For the collector who has almost everything, there’s a chance this week to claim ownership of a Bible that literally was out of this world.
A Los Angeles auction firm is taking bids on a microform, or photographically reduced, King James Bible that went to the moon on the 1971 Apollo 14 space flight. Similar in appearance to a piece of microfilm, the microform is certified as containing the entire biblical text. Its print is so small that one needs a microscope to read it.
The tiny, space-traveling Bible was one of 11 that left Earth’s atmosphere in the care of landing module commander Edgar Mitchell, who died in 2016 on the eve of the 45th anniversary of that lunar landing. He carried them in a container for personal items. A print Bible would have been too heavy for a space mission, but the lightweight versions posed no obstacle.
Minimum bid for the rarity is $50,000, according to the Nate D. Sanders auction firm, which will close bidding at 5 p.m. Pacific time on Thursday (July 26).
Apollo 14, carrying astronauts Alan Shepard Jr., Stuart Roosa and Edgar Mitchell, lifts off from the Kennedy Space Center on Jan. 31, 1971. Photo courtesy of Creative Commons
According to auction house spokesman Sam Heller, a similar lunar Bible flew along for the famously aborted Apollo 13 mission of 1970, in which mechanical malfunctions forced astronauts back to Earth under hardship conditions. That Bible sold for $62,500 last year despite never having reached the moon. Heller said the firm wouldn’t guess at a final bid for this latest item, which is being offered on consignment by an unnamed collector.
Mitchell’s lunar Bible was the creation of a group known as the Apollo Prayer League, according to the auction house. John Stout, a NASA information scientist and an ordained pastor, started the league after the 1967 launchpad deaths of Apollo 1 astronauts Gus Grissom, Edward White II and Roger Chaffee. Stout was close to White and they often prayed together. Knowing that White wanted to carry a Bible to the moon, Stout devised the microform version as a way to fulfill White’s vision.
Mitchell’s Bible-carrying mission wasn’t the first time religious paraphernalia had reached the lunar surface. Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, an elder at Webster Presbyterian Church in Houston, brought with him a small piece of bread and miniature chalice. With holy elements in hand, he took Communion on the moon on Sunday, July 20, 1969.
The so-called lunar Bible measures 1.625 inches square. It is centered in a gold and enamel setting measuring 4 inches by 6 inches.
The chance to own it could be tempting for a Bible collector with deep pockets, according to R. Michael Kuykendall, a New Testament studies professor at Gateway Seminary in Vancouver, Wash., and chief editor of the International Society of Bible Collectors’ Bible Review Journal.
“It has a place in Bible collecting,” he said of the lunar Bible. “That’s publicity. That’s an interest.”
While many of his group’s members focus on finding the best-preserved editions of older volumes such as the 16th-century Geneva Bible, there are those interested in finding more “esoteric” editions, such as the moon-landed microform Bible.
“There’s nothing else that would compare to that,” Kuykendall said. However, the $50,000 price tag might put off some buyers.
“I build my own collection $50 at a time,” he said.
Heller suggested a museum might also be interested in the space-launched Bible. The recently opened Museum of the Bible in Washington, D.C., already has one of the Apollo 14 lunar Bibles. The museum tweetedout a video Tuesday documenting the historic item.

‘One God, One Community’ brings
faiths together in Evansville
In 2017, Bishop Charles Thompson, then of Evansville, Indiana, approached Benedictine Fr. Godfrey Mullen, pastor of St. Benedict Cathedral Parish, to ask the parish to spearhead Catholic participation in “One God, One Community” – Evansville’s interfaith community effort.
There was pushback from some parishioners.
The fear was that Catholic faith would be presented in a wishy-washy way, a milquetoast compendium of beliefs intended to be palatable to a wider community. Thompson was soon off to become archbishop of Indianapolis, and Mullen was left to deal with the anxiety.
Support independent Catholic journalism. Become an NCR Forward member for $5 a month.
They needn’t have worried from the track record of the series of events sponsored by the group over the past year.
“It could not have been more powerful,” said Mullen. Among the four participating congregations – including Evansville’s First PresbyterianTemple Adath B’Nai Israel, a Reform Jewish congregation; and the Evansville Islamic Society – friendships have emerged and discussions, much of the time over ethnic food, have flourished as the diverse religious community of Indiana’s third-largest city gets to better know each other.
“One God, One Community” has offered programs on history, immigration, theology, the role of sacred space, rituals and holidays among the different faiths. While there is much pleasant community-building, the group has not shied away from sensitive issues. The group once sponsored a talk by Christian Picciolini, a former white supremacist. In the process, the congregations have discovered a common core of values, even if clothed in different cultural and historical terms by the three Abrahamic religions.
Rabbi Gary Mazo said his congregation has joined in support for projects – such as the local Habitat for Humanity – with members of the other congregations. “There’s a desire to be part of something bigger than ourselves,” he said.
“People find support. They are not alone. They feel validated,” he said, noting that the small Jewish community in Evansville, which has declined in number over the years, welcomes being part of the wider civic and charitable life in the city.
That affirmation is needed in a difficult time for interfaith relations, Mazo said. Evansville has had its nastier moments, including shots fired at the synagogue – no one was injured – and a car that rammed the Islamic Center soon after 9/11.
Evansville’s Muslims also see the interfaith group as a bridge to the rest of the city, said Mohammad Hussain, a physician and president of the Islamic Center. Each group sponsors particular events, and it was left to the Muslims to provide an Independence Day celebration. The Islamic Center responded with food and fireworks, after an interfaith discussion of the role of religious faith in patriotism.
“We understand we have different faiths but are walking on the same path,” said Hussain.
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Religious leaders said the group has reinforced their own beliefs while creating greater respect for others.
Some in the group cooperate beyond the regular gatherings. For example, Mazo and the Rev. Kevin Fleming, pastor of First Presbyterian, cover for each other on vacations. The church and the congregation have also exchanged pulpits.
While the Catholics are newcomers, the origins of the group grew out of a 2014 comedy tour that came to Evansville featuring a Jew, a Christian and a Muslim gently lampooning differences and commonalities. The Catholic parish’s 3,000 members are the largest of the congregations.
Evansville’s effort can be a model for other cities, the religious leaders said. Each tradition had a variation of the pushback of fear that beliefs would be watered down to accommodate a common denominator. But that hasn’t happened.
“As long as there is respect, and no one resorts to proselytizing, it’s an easy thing to do,” said Mullen.
He said that despite divergent traditions, other religious congregations face similar issues. The personalities in congregations may hold different beliefs, but they are remarkably similar, as religious organizations deal with internal conflicts, fundraising and other practical issues.
While each group is different, in many ways they are very much the same, said Mullen.
[Peter Feuerherd is a correspondent for NCR’s Field Hospital series on parish life and is a professor of journalism at St. John’s University, New York.]

Below is an interesting posting on Facebook about a Jewish woman’s experience in Istanbul!!
One of my friends is spending her summer in Istanbul, Turkey. She just told me about a really interesting experience she had… “A couple days ago we were wandering around the city and it was getting close to shkiah (sunset). I wanted to daven (pray) mincha (the afternoon prayer) and my friend suggested I find a mosque to daven in. I wasn’t so sure at first (mostly I was afraid the people running the mosque would have a problem with it), but he talked me into it (it’s actually preferable according to Jewish law to daven in a mosque rather than out in the street). They were totally fine with it. They gave me a head scarf to wear when I entered because even though I was dressed tznua (modestly) by Jewish standards I wasn’t according to Islam. And the coolest part of the story? From Istanbul, Jerusalem and Mecca are in the same direction, so both Jews and Muslims pray facing the same way. And the mosque was beautiful. I had much more kavanah (spiritual connection and intent) than I would have in the middle of a bustling sidewalk.”

Reinventing religion – with romance novels
By Kimberly Winston
Vanessa Zoltan (Courtesy of Harrison Becker)
Can novels where bodices rip and manhoods throb be considered sacred? The creator of a new podcast says the answer is an emphatic, “Yes! Oh, yes!” “For something to be sacred, the way we think about it, it has to teach you to be better at loving,” said Vanessa Zoltan, the 36-year-old who created the podcast, which will be called – ahem – “Hot and Bothered.” The show encourages listeners to write their own romance novels as a sacred practice.
“This will be a place where people can think out loud about what love is. Romantic love or friendship or hospitality – whatever. It will be a place of imagination, and I think that is a virtuous thing,” she said. Then she added: “And romance novels are more fun to talk about than Leviticus. I have done both and I stand by that.”
The podcast will premiere in October and appear weekly through the end of the year. And while some traditional believers may roll their eyes, Zoltan and the band of 20- and 30-something wannabe writers she has lined up to contribute to “Hot and Bothered” say it is another example of how their millennial generation is breaking with traditional religious practices to create meaning in new ways.

“The church for many people is a gift, but for others, it is a place of trauma, a place where they have been told that not all of their identity is welcome,” said Zoltan, a graduate of Harvard Divinity School. “Those people are leaving the church, and we need to come up with new spiritual technologies.”
Culturally Jewish and a self-identified atheist, Zoltan herself could be a poster child for the new millennial brand of spirituality.
At Harvard, she studied Charlotte Brontë’s “Jane Eyre” as a sacred text. Then she co-founded “Harry Potter and the Sacred Text,” a podcast exploring the meaning of friendship, power, grief, integrity and other themes through the J.K. Rowling novels. It is now one of iTunes’ most popular podcasts, with 9 million downloads a year.

Her new podcast project was born after the 2016 election, when she found herself obsessing over the news to the point of sleeplessness. The only thing that offered relief, she found, was reading romances – novels whose lurid, louche covers open upon worlds in which everyone is beautiful, the good always triumph, the bad are always punished and, above all, love always wins. She read 27 of them in 60 days.
Then she started writing one.
That led to deep conversations with friends about the nature of love, the value of fidelity, the power of sacrifice and more. It wasn’t long before she thought, “This would make a good podcast.”
But can writing a romance be a sacred practice? “In order for something to be sacred it needs three things,” Zoltan said. “It needs faith, rigor and community.” Faith that the act of writing can bring real blessings, rigor in the commitment to write regularly and community in the podcast’s listeners and team.

Brent Plate, who teaches courses on religion and popular culture at Hamilton College, says “Hot and Bothered” is a good example of how millennials are redefining religion for themselves. “Millennials are perhaps the first generation in which a broad swath of them grew up without traditional religious practices,” he said in an email. “This has allowed them to rethink and reimagine the need for a community of people to come together for a common activity and common interest, so they are making communal rituals out of going to music festivals, cosplay, and writing romance novels together. The content has changed, but the form hasn’t.”
Rethinking and reimagining does not mean replacing. Zoltan is not suggesting listeners write steamy scenes instead of going to church, temple or mosque. “I am definitely not saying this should take the place of any spiritual practice people already have,” she said. “But like St. Augustine said, anything that makes you better at loving is a good thing.”

Ariana Nedelman, a 26-year-old Harvard Divinity School graduate who produces the Harry Potter podcast, will produce “Hot and Bothered,” as well. “I think that the loneliness and lostness of my generation means we are looking for a communal life that makes sense of the big questions – where do we go when we die, etc.,” Nedelman said. “Asking questions in community is right for us in a spiritual sense.”
For the podcast, Zoltan will be joined by a team of writers – from bestseller Julia Quinn to novices – who discuss a common romance trope on each episode: love at first sight, marriage of convenience, enemies to lovers and so on. Listeners will be encouraged to write their own romances and to share their writing experience with others in small, local groups. “Our dream is people listen to the podcast and then find each other and partner up,” Zoltan said.
The goal is not to publish but to explore what is sacred about human relationships. “For me, being a spiritual person means being a good person,” said Sejah Patel, a San Francisco-based public interest lawyer who is one of the writers who will be featured in the podcast. She is Hindu, and she is 30,000 words into her novel. “So to me a spiritual practice is simply how am I putting what I consider to be good into the world. And I believe I am putting good in the world because the writing is bringing me joy, the joy is allowing me to do my job, and my job is helping people. I can only do that with enthusiasm and freshness if my soul feels full and happy and not depleted.”
Plate sees “Hot and Bothered” as evidence of the malaise afflicting traditional religious institutions. “The old-school, churchgoing Christians, I think they’re going to have to realize that their stories and rituals no longer meet the bodily and communal needs of people,” he said.
But can writing romance novels, even with faith, rigor and community, serve up the spiritual sustenance of traditional religions such as Christianity, Judaism and Islam? Only if it moves beyond individual fulfillment, Plate thinks. But perhaps it really can.

WISDOM Mission Statement

To Provide concrete modeling of women from different faith traditions working together in harmony for the common good.
To Empower women to take a more active role in furthering social justice and world peace.
To Dispel myths, stereotypes, prejudices and fear about faith traditions different from our own.
To Nurture the growth of empathy and spiritual energy that result from our projects and interfaith dialogue.

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WISDOM’s challenge is to bring together people from different faith traditions, ethnicities, races, and cultures in an atmosphere of safety and respect to engage in educational and community service projects. Let’s change our world through the positive power of building relationships!