WISDOM Newsletter – December 2012

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THE WISDOM WINDOW
DECEMBER 2012
 

 

WISDOM

Sunday, December 2

10:30 AM, House of Worship Visit to the Bharatiya Hindu Temple in Troy (6850 North Adams Road).  Learn about the Hindu Religion and enjoy a light vegetarian lunch.  For more information contact Padma Kuppa at padma.kuppa@gmail.com

Tuesday, December 4

Join us at WISDOM’s first ethnic social dinner.  See flyer below!!

Sunday, December 16

8:15 PM, Bruce Feiler, Omid Safi and Karen King, “God is One: Moses, Jesus, Muhammad” at the West Bloomfield Jewish Community Center (6600 West Maple Road, West Bloomfield 48322) in the Berman Center for the Performing Arts. Co-sponsored by WISDOM and the Interfaith Leadership Council.  See Flyer Below!

Sunday, January 27

The 2013 Fourteenth Annual World Sabbath, 4:00 – 5:30 PM, with an afterglow from 5:30 – 6:30 PM which includes an interfaith mosaic tile project! At the Bharatiya (Hindu) Temple!  See flyer below!

Wednesday, February 6

Join us at another WISDOM ethnic social dinner.  Details to be decided.

Sunday, March 10

 iCOVER: A Day in the Life of a Muslim-American COVERed Girl, Presentation by Sadaf Syed at the Muslim Unity Center in Bloomfield Hills from 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM. More information to come!!

Sunday April 7

4:00 PM to 6:30 PM “Bread! Bread! Bread!”  Let’s explore the importance of bread across different faith traditions!  Keynote speaker will be Lynne Golodner, author of Holy Breads.  More information to come!

In this issue
Calendar of Events
Visit to the Bharatiya (Hindu) Temple
WISDOM’s Ethnic Dinner
SAJE events Co-sponsored by WISDOM
Women and Buddhism Lecture
Professor Lupovitch Lectures coming in February
The 14th Annual World Sabbath
Interreligious Dialogue for Peace
Metro Detroit Interfaith Warmth
Young Jews and Muslims team up!
Interfaith Harmony
Interfaith Thanksgiving Service in Hamtramck
Five Women Five Journeys
Friendship and Faith
Links

WISDOM IS SPONSORING A VISIT TO

THE BHARATIYA (HINDU) TEMPLE

6850 N. Adams Rd.

Troy Michigan 49098

Sunday, December 2nd

FROM 10:30 AM TO 1:00 PM

WISDOM and the Bharatiya Temple invite you to a visit which includes a guided tour of the temple, an opportunity to view their worship service and share in a Prasad meal.

10:30 AM – Guided tour by Padma Kuppa and Anjali Vale begins in the lobby. This will be followed by a short presentation and Q and A session.

11:30 AM – Worship service

Noon – Join Temple members and guests for a Prasad meal, a meal shared by the community.  The meal is free of charge.

Since we will be sitting on the floor during the service, and we must remove our shoes before entering the sanctuary, it is a good idea to wear modest clothes and socks.

For more information call Paula Drewek (586-419-6811) or Padma Kuppa (248-930-0478)

Our WISDOM ethnic dinner social will give all of us an opportunity to meet and get to know each other in a fun, informal atmosphere. We plan to explore different ethnic restaurants by getting together every 2 months so be sure to stay tuned for our exciting future adventures. Each person will be responsible for purchasing her own meal and beverage.

AS A VALUED FRIEND OF WISDOM

YOU ARE INVITED TO JOIN US

FOR OUR FIRST ETHNIC DINNER SOCIAL

DATE:    TUESDAY, DEC. 4, 2012

                          TIME:     6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
PLACE: 2BOOLI  (Mediterranean Cuisine)
Address: 37610 West 12 Mile Rd

 Farmington Hills, MI 48331
248-994-0614

Our Friends are an integral partner in everything we do. Together we have provided food for the needy, backpacks for homeless children, and we have engaged the community on topics of common interest – most recently interfaith discussions on angels in religion and how faith communities are dealing with the lack of clean water worldwide.

 

Together we have challenged stereotypes and prejudice by sharing our stories – either in print with our WISDOM book, on our website www.interfaithwisdom.com, or in person at our signature presentation “Five Women Five Journeys.” Most of all, we have empowered women through the friendships we have nurtured and the hearts and minds that we have opened.

 

We look forward to seeing you so please contact Anjali or Raj by Dec. 2 if you plan to attend.

 

    Anjali Vale by email at

anjuc_31@yahoo.comor call 248-219-6897 or
Raj Chehl by email at rajchehl@gmail.com or call 248-464-0416

Ven. Bup Mee, (also known as Kevin Hickey), Monk and Dharma Teacher, will be presenting a lecture on Women in Buddhism at the Muddy Water Zen, 2421 Yale Ave., Royal Oak (248-330-0135)  between 11:30 AM and 12:30 PM on Sunday, December 2nd. Free and open to the public!

 

Contact Bup Mee at bupmee@gmail.com http://muddywaterzen.org

 

COMING SOON TO METRO-DETROIT!!

The 2013 FOURTEENTH ANNUAL WORLD SABBATH

SUNDAY, JANUARY 27th FROM 4:00 – 5:30 PM

WITH AN AFTER-GLOW FROM 5:30 PM TO 6:30 PM

INCLUDING AN OPPORTUNITY TO PARTICIPATE

IN AN INTERFAITH MOSAIC TILE PROJECT

AT THE BHARATIYA (HINDU) TEMPLE

6850 NORTH ADAMS RD, TROY, MI 48098

OUR YOUTH AND YOUNG ADULTS

WILL BE LEADING THE SERVICE WITH PEACE PRAYERS

FROM DIFFERENT FAITH TRADITIONS

AND THE CHILDREN OF PEACE OF MANY RELIGIONS

WILL BE WAVING PEACE BANNERS

AND SINGING “WE ARE CHILDREN OF PEACE” TOGETHER!!

OUR ETHNIC DANCE AND MUSIC WILL HIGHLIGHT

 THE DIVERSITY OF METRO DETROIT!!

 

The Rev. Richard Peacock

Will Be Receiving the 2013 World Sabbath Peace Award!!

DON’T MISS THIS FABULOUS INTERFAITH EVENT!!

VISIT WWW.WORLDSABBATH.ORG FOR MORE INFORMATION!

CANNED FOOD DONATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED

FOR THE HUNGRY AND HOMELESS IN DETROIT!

FOR ANSWERS TO YOUR QUESTIONS AND TO GET INFORMATION ABOUT

HOW TO GET THE YOUTH FROM YOUR HOUSE OF WORSHIP INVOLVED

CONTACT GAIL KATZ, WORLD SABBATH CHAIR

  gailkatz@comcast.net 248-978-6664

 

 BIRMINGHAM COMMUNITY HOUSE HOSTS EVENT

ABOUT INTERRELIGIOUS DIALOGUE FOR PEACE

IN THE MIDDLE EAST

 

From Left to Right: Sheri Schiff, Victor Begg, Brenda Rosenberg, Rabbi Ron Kronish, Qadi Iyad Zahalka, and Sherry Rogers  

 

THE OTHER PEACE PROCESS:

INTERRELIGIOUS DIALOGUE IN THE SERVICE OF PEACE

  

By Dr. Ron Kronish

Qadi Iyad Zahalka, the judge of the Muslim Sharia court in Jerusalem of the state of

Israel, and I were grateful for the opportunity to be able to present our ideas to members of Detroit’s interreligious, academic and civic communities last week, during our two-day whirlwind visit to the Detroit area on October 24-25, 2012. We also appreciated the opportunity to share our moderate message of peaceful coexistence with such receptive audiences.

We talked about “the other peace process”. Not the political peace process (which has been in a stalemate for several years); but the people-to-people peace-building process, the one that brings people from different religions and nationalities together to encounter each other substantively and sensitively in order to find ways to live in peaceful coexistence together. We believe strongly in the importance of this “other” peace process for sustainable living together, now and in the future.

Kadi Zahalka is a Palestinian, Arab, Muslim, Israeli citizen and a respected judge in our country.

 I am a Reform rabbi who moved to Israel 33 years ago, to “go up” to live in the land and state of Israel and have served in educational and communal positions in

Jerusalem for over three decades. We spoke in the Community House of Birmingham, at the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies of Wayne State University, and at First Presbyterian Church in Birmingham. I suspect that this may have been the first time in the greater Detroit area that a Qadi and a rabbi spoke at a Presbyterian Church!! Maybe we made history, but we’ll have to “google it” to be sure! In addition, our public dialogues in the Detroit area were co-sponsored by a wide range of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, interfaith, and civic organizations, probably unprecedented in the recent history of Detroit. We are grateful for the extraordinary organizational efforts of Brenda Rosenberg of Pathways for Peace Foundation and Sheri Schiff from the Jewish community, Victor Begg from the Muslim community and Al Timms of the Presbytery of Detroit for their efforts to reach to so many diverse communities in the Detroit area.

 

Our message was one that is not usually heard outside of Israel — a message of

moderation which emphasizes that peaceful living is possible! And that our conflict can come to an end, as other seemingly hopeless conflicts have ended in what might have seemed as intractable situations in the world, such as in Northern Ireland, South Africa, Bosnia and other places. Qadi Zahalka, who represents a new generation of serious and dynamic Muslim judges in Israel, presented a moderate, liberal interpretation of Islam, as he lives and practices it, that is largely unknown and unrecognized outside of Israel, even though his style of Islam is the dominant one in Israel. He talked about how Islam in Israel is different from Islam in Iran or Gaza or Lebanon or Saudi Arabia, where the extremists have captured

the regimes and the headlines.

 

And at each public dialogue, I shared with audiences in the Detroit area our new thinking about the method of dialogue, as well as the message and importance of peace. I explained why and how interreligious and intercultural dialogue are essential ingredients for a lasting peace. Politics can only produce the framework for peace. We religious leaders and educators and psychologists and social workers can help people learn to live in peace together. Dialogue, education and action are the methods to achieve this. We also both demonstrated how a Qadi and a rabbi can be genuine colleagues and friends. We reject both Islamophobia — which is strengthened by hate ads in subways and on videos on youtube — and we reject anti-semitism in any form, whether on the college campus or via the internet. We respect each other’s religions and cultures -both our common values and our different paths — and we vow to increase mutual understanding through our actions as well as our words.

 

Finally, we presented for Jews, Christians and Muslims in the Detroit area the

challenges as we look towards the future, and explained how dialogue and education will play a critical role in a viable peace process -based on genuine mutual understanding in the years and decades ahead. Our role is not to solve the macro political problems of the region. That task is for the politicians and diplomats. Our task — as religious leaders, educators and activists in our communities — is to change the hearts and minds of the people on both sides of the conflict to be able to live in peaceful relations over the long haul.

——————————————————————————————–

Rabbi Dr. Ron Kronish serves as the Director of the Interreligious Coordinating Council in Israel and the Jerusalem Center for Jewish Christian Relations. He blogs for the Times of Israel (www.timesofisrael.com) and can be reached at

 

 

 

Metro Detroit Interfaith Warmth 

 

Metro Detroit Interfaith Warmth is an educational program that is designed to educate everyone at our congregations about what is available to help keep people warm this winter.  We are looking at warmth from three different avenues to help make sure people have the tools to stay warm this winter with state and federal funds available for all three to provide discounted if not free services:

 

1)  Utility Assistance

2)  Energy Efficiency

3)  Weatherization

 

Until now this information hasn’t been compiled in an easily accessible way that we can share to help keep people warm.

 

The next step is to work with individual congregations to figure out the best strategy to get this information out.  This can be through sermons, presentations, workshops or just having the information available where services are provided.

 

Joe Rashid is available to work with you to provide assistance!  Contact Joe at 313-575-7014 or jrashid.iflc@gmail.com or visit www.metrodetroitinterfaithwarmth.com

 

Young Jewish, Muslim professionals
 team up to better Detroit

When a group of Muslim and Jewish young professionals came together Saturday night to shoot some hoops, their minds were focused on the game, even as fighting between Israelis and Palestinian escalates in the Gaza strip. A group of about 15 men and one woman representing both religious communities split into teams for pickup basketball at the HYPE Recreation Center. The goal was to bring different groups together to focus on problems much closer to home: ways to improve Detroit.

“We’re informally coming together to play a game common to both and that we’re all interested in, really,” said Yusuf Begg from the Michigan Muslim Community Council. “The goal is for young professionals to come together and learn about each other’s backgrounds and to work together to help Detroit.”

 

For Dearborn attorney Tarek Baydoun, any attempt to equate the game to issues in the Middle East is misguided. “We can agree to disagree on foreign policy but still live together in peace,” said the 28-year-old. “Muslims and Jews are doing very well as communities in southeast Michigan and this is an effort to bring them all together to work on issues that affect everyone.” The groups had been planning the game for months, but with violence growing in the Middle East, the game is being played amid a new context.

 

The escalating crisis in Israel and the Gaza Strip is inflaming passions among Metro Detroit’s Jewish and Arab-American communities. On Friday night, a protest condemning Israel’s airstrikes on Gaza was held near the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel in downtown Detroit. The Michigan office of the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee calls Israel’s actions a “slaughter” of the people in Gaza. Local Jewish leaders, for their part, say Israel is defending itself against missiles fired against its civilians, including – for the first time Friday – in Jerusalem. But the groups organizing the basketball game are hoping to find understanding and connection through the camaraderie of sport.

 

“What else is something that brings everyone together in an informal way where everyone is an equal?,” said Detroiter Justin Jacobs, who founded the sports league organization Come Play Detroit. “We wanted to show that while we are all tied to our backgrounds, we all have our own interest and we’re all passionate about Detroit.”

From The Detroit News:

Interfaith harmony between metro Detroit Jews,

 Muslims during tough times

 

Jews and Muslims across metro Detroit are forging close ties in a series of events to promote harmony between the two groups amid growing tensions in the Middle East this week as fighting escalates between Israel and Gaza.

 

Jews are visiting mosques and Muslims are visiting synagogues in an effort organized by the Foundation for Ethnic Understanding, a New York City-based group that’s behind similar events this weekend across the U.S.

 

On Friday, about 15 Jews visited Imam Abdullah El-Amin’s Mosque – The Muslim Center of Detroit during services. More events are planned today at local community and religious institutions in Dearborn Heights, Detroit, West Bloomfield and Bloomfield Hills.

 

“We have to relate to each other beyond politics and religion,” Nick Mazzola, 44, a Jewish resident of Riverview, said after the Muslim services. “We’re fellow human beings sharing a common space. It’s about understanding other people … metro Detroit is truly a global world now.”

 

Basheer Alim, 61, a Muslim Commerce Township resident, said he was glad Jewish people attended Friday’s service. “Interfaith relations are absolutely necessary,” Alim said. “There has to be a concerted effort to reach out.”

Founded in 1989 to improve black-Jewish relations, the Foundation for Ethnic Understanding — which planned the events well before the Gaza conflict erupted — has also focused on Latino-Jewish relations, and in recent years, Muslim-Jewish relations.

“Hopefully this can serve as a paradigm that could impact the state of relations between Muslims and Jews in the Middle East,” said Rabbi Marc Schneier, founder and president of the group, whose chairman is hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons.

Imam Abdullah El-Amin, who heads the Muslim Center and has been an interfaith leader for decades, said of Muslim-Jewish relations: “People think we’re supposed to be war all the time and be antagonistic. But we see each other as brothers and sisters.”

 

In recent years, the two communities have had tensions at times in metro Detroit. But generally speaking, “Jews and Muslims get along well,” said Rabbi Dorit Edut of Huntington Woods, who attended Friday’s mosque services.

 

Contact Niraj Warikoo: 313-223-4792 or nwarikoo@freepress.com

Hamtramck Mayor, Others from Oakland and Macomb Counties Celebrate Thanksgiving, and,

Anniversary of  Founding of CWA – the “First Ever Coming Together of Clergy in Hamtramck’s History”

By Lawrence M. Ventline, Citizen Journalist

Special to the Oakland Press

A police officer sounded his siren, magnified his speaker voice, and pulled over a driver just minutes before a crowd talked  “turkey” about reducing crime, building bridges, and the commonly-held mandate of Jewish, Christians, Muslims, and Buddhists, among other faith traditions to “love God and neighbor.”

 

They came from West Bloomfield, Ferndale, Center Line, and the entire Detroit area to give thanks and praise for “the first time in Hamtramck’s history when clergy  organized two years ago, called, the Common Word Alliance,” according to leaders.

 

“What’s going on inside here,” asked a lad who stood by watching the patrol car across the street from a park where a handful of youngsters were playing before dark this eve of Thanksgiving Day.

 

A healthy Hamtramck was on the minds of founder, Arif Huskic, Dan and Sharon Buttry, Muhammed Razon, Imams Abdul Latif and Feljem Salkic, Jennifer Young, Sheikh Saleh al-Gahim, among others in the crowd.

 

“The CWA anniversary celebration and Thanksgiving Day of prayer shows that the Hamtramck and surrounding communities can celebrate our commonalities, as well as our differences of diverse prayers for peace,” said Gail Katz of West Bloomfield.  “It is helping to turn hostility into hospitality,” added Katz,who is chairperson of World Sabbath, and, co-founder of Women’s Interfaith Solutions for Dialog and Outreach in Metropolitan Detroit.

 

Giving thanks, the original natives, colonists, and crime, the Civil War, and, more concerns, surfaced November 21 on the corner of Joseph Campau at Danforth.

 

Wampanoag Indians and Plymouth colonists were part of an autumn harvest feast in 1621.  Two hundred years later, Thanksgiving was marked by singular colonies and states, but, in 1863, an annual, national  celebration was proclaimed by President Abraham Lincoln.

 

Michigan’s most internationally diverse city with about 22,423 residents was originally settled by German farmers and Polish factory workers at the  Dodge Brothers facility in 1914.

 

Today, however, the faces and faiths have changed. Immigrants from the Middle East and South Asia, among others, celebrated Thanksgiving Wednesday with clergy leaders of the ecumenical Common  Word Alliance in the People’s Community Services.

 

“God Almighty knows about us on our second anniversary of founding and the world needs to know that leaders came together to pray for global peace,” added Huskic, from Bosnia.

 

“The police department has been enhanced,” admitted an excited Buttry. He told of a “love of God and neighbor” initiative similar to neighbors on each block taking time to know and trust who lives next door, a major thrust of the ecumenical All Faiths Festival “that aims to foster dialog among all faith traditions, strengthen families and marriage and, to stop the conflicts that begin in people’s hearts,” added AFF leader, John Domenick of Center Line.

 

Ferndale resident Jennifer Young, ticked off a list of public events hosted by the Detroit Interfaith Outreach Network (DION) that is steered by Rabbi Dorit Edut of Huntington Woods.

 

Participants praised citizens for local and national reports that  show that U.S. crime has consistently dropped over the last 20 years, while crime, guns and limiting assault weapons was not reflected in the polls of voter’s concern November 6.

 

There were 351 violent crimes committed in Hamtramck in 2010, with 22,423 residents, a city similar to the population of Harrison Township near Mt. Clemens, according to the latest statistics available. Only one crime of murder or (non-negligent) manslaughter was listed, amid 152 crimes of robbery, 186 crimes of aggravated assaults, and 300 crimes of motor vehicle theft. Some categories were not reported, however, while  “crime is as commonly accepted as blowing one’s nose,” admitted a volunteer who was mopping the hallway floor.

 

Organizers praised a community garden that residents on Goodson Street  harvested with CWA this summer.

 

“We have to reduce crime in Hamtramck,” concluded Huskic. Buttry, however, a minister, and, a long-time leader in interfaith relations in Detroit, was optimistic, and, said the “crime is down.”

 

Hamtramck Mayor Karen Majewski greeted the guests and gave “thanks to you for whom I’m grateful,” said the long-time leader wiping away tears.

 

“Neighbors need to know God and one another,” said  Rev. Bogdan Milosz, a pastor at Our Lady Queen of Apostles Church on Conant near Caniff in Hamtramck.

+

(Reach Reach Rev. Lawrence M. Ventline, D.Min., a pastor, and, a board certified professional counselor, and, a former first executive director of the ecumenical Michigan Coalition for Human Rights, head of All Faiths Festival, at (313) 530 2777. Visit http://www.religionrootsrelationships.blogspot.com/.   He is a native of Detroit who resides in Harrison Township).

Five Women Five Journeys: How Different Are We?
 WISDOM Women together

This unique WISDOM program features personal stories of women of different faith traditions – how their childhood impacted their beliefs today, what the challenges are for women in their faith tradition, what parts of their religion are misunderstood, how reaching out to someone from a different faith has enriched their lives.
To inquire about a Five Women Five Journeys Program for your organization, contact Paula Drewek at Drewekpau@aol.com .

Check out the latest story about a friendship that crosses religion, race, or ethnic boundaries at www.friendshipandfaith.com.
Email Gail Katz at gailkatz@comcast.net if you have a personal story for the friendshipandfaith.com website!!

LINKS THAT YOU CAN USE FOR MORE INFORMATION!! 

 1)  Go to http://www.readthespirit.com/religious-holidays-festivals/ for fascinating information about upcoming Religious holidays that your neighbors of different faith traditions may be celebrating!!
 

2)   Go to http://www.readthespirit.com/were-making-news/ for a listing of all the articles written about the WISDOM Book Friendship and Faith: the WISDOM of Women Creating Alliances for Peace.

WISDOM Mission Statement

To Provide concrete modeling of women from different faith traditions working together in harmony for the common good.
To Empower women to take a more active role in furthering social justice and world peace.
To Dispel myths, stereotypes, prejudices and fear about faith traditions different from our own.
To Nurture the growth of empathy and spiritual energy that result from our projects and interfaith dialogue.

Join WISDOM

WISDOM is a Non-Profit Organization. Get involved with WISDOM!

WISDOM’s challenge is to bring together people from different faith traditions, ethnicities, races, and cultures in an atmosphere of safety and respect to engage in educational and community service projects. Let’s change our world through the positive power of building relationships!