WISDOM Newsletter – January 2016

Written by WISDOM on . Posted in Newsletters

Calendar for WISDOM and Other Interfaith Events  

 
Tuesday, January 12, 2016
Five Women Five Journeys
Unity of Livonia
28660 Five Mile Road
Livonia, MI 48154
For more information contact MaryAnn Schlie at maryann_schlie@hotmail.com

 

COMING SOON TO METRO-DETROIT!!
 

The 2016 SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL WORLD SABBATH
SUNDAY, MARCH 6TH FROM 4:00 – 5:30 PM
WITH AN AFTER-GLOW FROM 5:30 PM TO 6:30 PM

FORT STREET PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
631 W. Fort Street
Detroit, MI 48226

OUR YOUTH AND YOUNG ADULTS
WILL BE LEADING THE SERVICE WITH PEACE PRAYERS
FROM DIFFERENT FAITH TRADITIONS
AND THE CHILDREN OF PEACE OF MANY RELIGIONS
WILL BE WAVING PEACE BANNERS
AND SINGING “WE ARE CHILDREN OF PEACE” TOGETHER!!
OUR ETHNIC DANCE AND MUSIC WILL HIGHLIGHT
 THE DIVERSITY OF METRO DETROIT!!
We Welcome Clergy and Religious Leaders
To Lead Us in an Interfaith Prayer for World Peace!!

DON’T MISS THIS FABULOUS INTERFAITH EVENT!!

VISIT WWW.WORLDSABBATH.ORG FOR MORE INFORMATION!

FOR ANSWERS TO YOUR QUESTIONS AND
TO GET INFORMATION ABOUT
HOW TO GET THE YOUTH FROM YOUR HOUSE OF WORSHIP INVOLVED
CONTACT GAIL KATZ or MEREDITH SKOWRONSKI – WORLD SABBATH CHAIRS
If you are Clergy or a Religious Leader planning to attend,
please contact Gail or Meredith
  gailkatz@comcast.net   248-978-6664
Meredith.skowronski@gmail.com 248-250-4157

Beautiful Words from our friend Steve Spreitzer!!

It is time to stand together in the face of hate

As Presidential candidate Donald Trump continues his message of hate, I am deeply troubled by those who are following him, united in their hatred of people who are Muslims and people of color, an irresistible combination for the small but loud group of people who are relationally challenged. I am equally offended by the mainstreaming of this hateful message by certain members of the media and other proclaimed leaders. The world and certainly the United States is watching to see who will emerge as a leader for all of us, standing against hate and with those neighbors who happen to be Muslims and other religions outside the mainstream, e.g., Hinduism and Sikhism. We encourage people in Michigan to contact their neighbors, coworkers and friends who are Muslim (Hindu or Sikh), asking how they are doing and letting them know of your support.  For those 62% of you who do not know a Muslim, take this as an opportunity to reach out via the Michigan Roundtable for Diversity and Inclusion, the Interfaith Leadership Council, WISDOM, the Michigan Muslim Community Council, the Council of American Islamic Relations, TAKE ON HATE or your local community interfaith or human relations group, e.g., Canton Interfaith Outreach, Troy Interfaith Group of the Macomb County based Interfaith Center for Racial Justice.  We look forward to continuing our 75 years of helping to make the places we work and live become places where all people are welcomed and treated fairly.

Helping to change the “Me” to “We,”
Steve Spreitzer, CEO, Michigan Roundtable for Diversity and Inclusion

Watch this video and learn about the InterFaith Leadership Council’s incredible program entitled
Religious Diversity Journeys for Seventh Graders!!

https://vimeo.com/143729993

Enjoy this music video by a Muslim artist called Raef

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hzs9DhbNHCs&utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=san_bernardino_dominates_media_headlines

 

Vatican Repudiates Conversion of Jews
By Gaia Pianigiani, New York Times

Catholics should not try to convert Jews, but should work together with them to fight anti-Semitism, the Vatican said on Thursday (December 10th) in a far-reaching document meant to solidify its increasingly positive relations with Jews. Despite a long history of mutual suspicion and conflict, Christianity and Judaism are deeply intertwined, and Christians should treat the subject of the Holocaust with sensitivity and repel any anti-Semitic tendencies, the Vatican wrote.  Titled “The Gifts and Calling of God are Irrevocable,” the document was issued by the Vatican’s Commission for Religious Relations with Jews. Addressing an issue that has been a sore point between the two faiths for centuries, the commission wrote that the church was “obliged to view evangelization to Jews, who believe in the one God, in a different manner from that to people of other religions and world views.” It specified that “the Catholic Church neither conducts nor supports any specific institutional mission work directed towards Jews.” Analysts said the language in the document seemed intended to put the issue to rest.  It clearly states that salvation doesn’t come from the Jews’ conversion, but it’s very respectful of their own mission,” said Alberto Melloni, the director of a liberal Catholic research institution, the John XXIII Foundation for Religious Studies in Bologna.  He called the message “a courageous and important written document of the Catholic Church.”

Coming 50 years after the Vatican formally repudiated the idea of collective Jewish guilt for Jesus’ death, the document emphasized the tight and inescapable link between Christianity and Judaism.  “A Christian can never be an anti-Semite, especially because of the Jewish roots of Christianity,” it stated. Cardinal Kurt Koch, the president of the Vatican Commission, said on Thursday that the church’s dialogue with Jews was not just interreligious, but “intrareligious or intrafamiliar.”  “To its great credit, this document seeks to reflect a sincere comprehension of Jewish self-understanding,” Rabbi David Rosen, the international director of interreligious affiars for the American Jewish Committee, said, sitting next to Vatican officials when the document was presented at a news conference.  He noted that the document quoted extensively from Jewish rabbinical sources and recognized their interpretive validity, as well as the place of the Torah in the life of Jews.  “It’s a major step in Jewish-Catholic relationship even that a rabbi and Jewish thinker were on sage with Cardinal Koch and Father Norber,” said Rabbi Eric J. Greenberg, the director of interfaith relations and outreach at the Multifaith Alliance for Syrian Refugees in New York City. “That the were invited to participate in a presentation of a Vatican document is such a great symbol,” Rabbi Greenberg said.

Before the Second Vatican council of 1962-65, Catholic prayers said on Good Friday, the day that commemorates Jesus’ crucifixion and death, called Jews “perfidious.”  The revisions to the Mass ordered by the council eliminated that characterization but some other language that Jewish groups found offensive continued to be said by ultratraditional Catholics using old-style Latin prayers, including a reference to “the blindness of that people.” Pope Benedict XVI ordered those prayers changed in 2008. The Vatican’s efforts to improve relations with Jews gained major impetus under Pope John Paul II. He was the first pope to pray in a synagogue, the first to acknowledge the failure of individual Catholics to act against the Holocaust and the first to call anti-Semitism a sin “against God and man.”  According to the document published on December 10th, Catholic institutions that train priests should integrate into their curricula both Nostra aetate, the 1965 declaration that condemned anti-Semitism, and the subsequent Holy See documents on Jews and Judaism.
 

Detroit archbishop denounces proposals to bar Muslims from U.S

(RNS) Without mentioning Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump by name, Detroit Archbishop Allen Vigneron has blasted proposals like Trump’s that would specifically bar Muslims from the U.S., saying the idea “fractures the very foundation of morality on which we stand.”
Vigneron’s denunciation, in a letter he sent on Thursday (Dec. 10) to his priests, is significant because Catholic leaders have been strong defenders of religious freedom in recent years but have been largely quiet in the wake of Trump’s controversial pitch earlier this week to bar all Muslims from the U.S.


Presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to the media
after meeting with a group of black pastors at his office
in the Manhattan borough of New York on Nov. 30, 2015.

“While the Catholic Church refrains from weighing in for or against individual candidates for a particular political office, the Church does and should speak to the morality of this important and far-reaching issue of religious liberty,” Vigneron wrote in the letter, which he also sent to imams in his state.
“Especially as our political discourse addresses the very real concerns about the security of our country, our families, and our values, we need to remember that religious rights are a cornerstone of these values,” he wrote.
“Restricting or sacrificing these religious rights and liberties out of fear – instead of defending them and protecting them in the name of mutual respect and justice – is a rationalization which fractures the very foundation of morality on which we stand.”
In the wake of recent attacks by Islamic extremists some political leaders, principally Republicans, have floated a number of proposals that would seek to limit the entry of refugees from Syria or provide an explicit religious test to refugees in an effort to reduce the chance that Muslims would enter the country and to favor Christian refugees.
Catholic organizations have been among the faith groups that have defied the orders of governors in some 30 states – including Michigan – against resettling Syrian refugees.

Five Women Five Journeys: How Different Are We?
 WISDOM Women together
This unique WISDOM program features personal stories of women of different faith traditions – how their childhood impacted their beliefs today, what the challenges are for women in their faith tradition, what parts of their religion are misunderstood, how reaching out to someone from a different faith has enriched their lives.

To inquire about a Five Women Five Journeys Program for your organization, contact Paula Drewek at Drewekpau@aol.com .

WISDOM Mission Statement

To Provide concrete modeling of women from different faith traditions working together in harmony for the common good.
To Empower women to take a more active role in furthering social justice and world peace.
To Dispel myths, stereotypes, prejudices and fear about faith traditions different from our own.
To Nurture the growth of empathy and spiritual energy that result from our projects and interfaith dialogue.

Join WISDOM

WISDOM is a Non-Profit Organization. Get involved with WISDOM!

WISDOM’s challenge is to bring together people from different faith traditions, ethnicities, races, and cultures in an atmosphere of safety and respect to engage in educational and community service projects. Let’s change our world through the positive power of building relationships!